YOU SHOULD NEVER GIVE POLICE CONSENT TO SEARCH YOUR HOME OR CAR IN FLORIDA

If a Florida law enforcement officer does not have a search warrant should you consent to a search of your home or car? Clearwater Criminal Defense Lawyers agree that you almost never have an obligation to consent to a search of your home or vehicle unless the officer has a proper search warrant. 
But what happens when officers conduct a search without a search warrant anyway? Upon the filing of a motion to suppress all evidence discovered incident to a warrantless search a Judge will hold a suppression hearing to look at the circumstances of the search. The Judge will look to see if you gave consent to the search and for what are known as exigent circumstances.

don quixote seeking justice would never give consent to search to police in Tampa Bay, Florida
 Quixotic Motion to Suppress

When you grant consent to search to a law enforcement officer,  your permission to search is sufficient for him to conduct the search as long as it’s within the scope of the permission to search which was given. For example, if you give permission to search your car it doesn’t mean you’ve given permission for a search of your home or your business records.

People mistakenly think counterintuively that somehow if permission is given for an officer to conduct a search that the officer will refrain from conducting a search because he will think that permission would only be given if there was nothing to find.

But officers in Florida are taught to look for evidence of crime, that’s what good officer’s do. So an officer who is given permission to search your home, business records, computer hard drive, cell phone, or vehicle will always conduct a search because he has nothing to lose. Some officers have been known to enhance the likelihood of evidence being found with search and seizure throw bags. If an officer should find any evidence of criminal conduct the evidence will not be suppressed by a judge.

As you can imagine it’s a tempting solution for some law enforcement officers to falsely state that there was consent to a search in the police report and falsely testify at the suppression hearing that consent to search was given when it wasn’t. You’ll want a Clearwater Criminal Defense Attorney to demand discovery, file a motion to suppress and establish for the Judge that you, not the officer, are being truthful at the suppression hearing.