TAMPA BAY POLICE SHOULD LEARN FROM BRITISH FORENSICS TEAM THAT SAVED BLIND LADY’S GOBSMACKED NOVEL OVER LUNCH

What was your last interaction with a police officer in Tampa Bay? Probably a speeding ticket. Possibly something worse. My last interaction went surprisingly well. I popped a contact lens directly onto the floor while going thru the electronic metal detector at the entrance of Court in Tampa. And to my surprise the officers would not let me leave until they’d found it. That’s exactly what we want from our officers – a little help, understanding and enthusiasm. 
If law enforcement officers want more than to be feared or loathed, they must do good things, not just spy on us then lie to us as the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Department’s Drug Squad has admitted doing nor by mindlessly handing out hefty driving tickets as the Florida Highway Patrol and Largo Police Department are well known for doing with ugly quota systems upon which the best honest, hard-working officers who refuse to give enough tickets are fired or demoted. What are PCSO Deputies, Florida Highway Patrol and Largo Police Officers doing to earn our respect? And at least one Clearwater Criminal Defense Attorney can tell you that not one of them has helped him find all his missing reading glasses  – oh, the shame of it!
Recently in England a team of forensic officers gave up lunches over five months to help a blind lady recover a written manuscript for a book. It was only when she asked her son to read the book, that she found she’d used a pen that had long since run out of ink, according to The Telegraph:

John Millais,The Blind Girl, 1856

 Miss Vickers said she was “gobsmacked” when Dorset police officers agreed to help by sacrificing their lunch hours over five months to study the indents made by her pen.

“I could remember the gist of what I had written but there was no way I could have written exactly the same way again,” she said. “I am so grateful. It was really nice of them and I want to thank them for helping me out.”
Miss Vickers, from Charmouth, near Lyme Regis, lost her sight seven years ago through diabetes and turned to her imagination for solace.
Here’s some advice from a Clearwater Criminal Defense Lawyer to the police and deputies in Pinellas – find people to help and help them – the gobsmacked look on their faces when they realize you’re not giving them a ticket will be more than enough to offset the loss of revenue and it will really brighten your day and theirs.