HERE’S YOUR CHOICE: FIVE YEARS IN JAIL OR SUBMIT YOURSELF TO A PUBLIC FLOGGING

The very highbrow Chronicle of Higher Education reluctantly endorses flogging. Should you? 


Which would you rather do, five years in prison or submit yourself to a flogging? The author, Peter Moskos, while conversing over a little too much red wine in New Orleans, finds an interesting idea as well as the title for his new book on crime and punishment in America.

Here is an excerpt from Peter Moskos’ article from the Chronicle of Higher Education (In Defense of Flogging – The Chronicle Review – The Chronicle of Higher Education

And yes, if you’d like to read an entire book about his thesis, the title of his new book, if you’ve not yet guessed, is of course,  In Defense of Flogging. I’ll pour some more of that red wine as you read.

Excerpt: For most of the past two centuries, at least in so-called civilized societies, the ideal of punishment has been replaced by the hope of rehabilitation. The American penitentiary system was invented to replace punishment with “cure.” Prisons were built around the noble ideas of rehabilitation. 
If you were sentenced to five years in prison but had the option of receiving lashes instead, what would you choose? You would probably pick flogging. Wouldn’t we all?
I propose we give convicts the choice of the lash at the rate of two lashes per year of incarceration. One cannot reasonably argue that merely offering this choice is somehow cruel, especially when the status quo of incarceration remains an option. Prison means losing a part of your life and everything you care for. Compared with this, flogging is just a few very painful strokes on the backside. And it’s over in a few minutes. Often, and often very quickly, those who said flogging is too cruel to even consider suddenly say that flogging isn’t cruel enough. 
My defense of flogging—whipping, caning, lashing, call it what you will—is meant to be provocative, but only because something extreme is needed to shatter the status quo. We are in denial about the brutality of the uniquely American invention of mass incarceration. 
America now has more prisoners, 2.3 million, than any other country in the world. Ever. Our rate of incarceration is roughly seven times that of Canada or any Western European country. Stalin, at the height of the Soviet gulag, had fewer prisoners than America does now (although admittedly the chances of living through American incarceration are quite a bit higher). We deem it necessary to incarcerate more of our people—in rate as well as absolute numbers—than the world’s most draconian authoritarian regimes. Think about that. Despite our “land of the free” motto, we have more prisoners than China, and they have a billion more people than we do.
All this because we’ve taken a traditional punishment such as flogging out of the arsenal. We’ve run out of choices, choices desperately needed if we’re to have any hope of reducing our incarceration rate by 85 percent, back in line with the rest of free world, back to a level we used to have. Faced with the choice between hard time and the lash, the lash is better. What does that say about prison?